Review : Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly | More2Read Reviews
 

Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly



Harry Bosch teams up with LAPD Detective Renée Ballard in the new novel from #1 New York Times bestselling author Michael Connelly.

Detective Renée Ballard is working the night beat–known in LAPD slang as “the late show”–and returns to Hollywood Station in the early hours to find a stranger rifling through old file cabinets. The intruder is retired detective Harry Bosch, working a cold case that has gotten under his skin.

Ballard can’t let him go through department records, but when he leaves, she looks into the case herself and feels a deep tug of empathy and anger. She has never been the kind of cop who leaves the job behind at the end of her shift–and she wants in.

The murder, unsolved, was of fifteen-year-old Daisy Clayton, a runaway on the streets of Hollywood who was brutally killed, her body left in a dumpster like so much trash. Now Ballard joins forces with Bosch to find out what happened to Daisy, and to finally bring her killer to justice. Along the way, the two detectives forge a fragile trust, but this new partnership is put to the test when the case takes an unexpected and dangerous turn.


Praise:

Dark Sacred Night for the first time brings together these two powerhouse detectives in a riveting story that unfolds with furious momentum. And it shows once more why “there’s no doubt Connelly is a master of crime fiction” – Associated Press

“It was only last year that Connelly introduced Ballard, a fierce and fascinating new protagonist who instantly emerged as a reader favorite. Bosch, meanwhile, is a grizzled veteran by now; Dark Sacred Night marks the 21st novel to center on him. But fans always finish eager to come back for more.”— David Canfield, Entertainment Weekly

“Few writers can capture the gritty streets of L.A.–and the inner workings of the LAPD–like Connelly.”— Entertainment Weekly

‘A master of the genre’ – Stephen King

‘A superb natural storyteller’ – Lee Child


Review:

There will be some justice and vengeance, guilt and grief.
Their relation formed together by a case, a nine year old case personal to Bosch, he knows victims mother, she was a runaway that worked the street, Daisy Clayton was aged fifteen.
Ballard and Bosch seem to have a possible promising future together.
Bosch a reserve now for San Fernando Police Department, more or less retired.
Some guys just can’t give it up homicide team business.
He does go after a cold case of his own, a murder that as a gang-on-gang killing and tracks down a witness and so putting himself in some possible dangers.
Ballard is still the coolest of the heart of darkness of the late show now in Hollywood Station moonlighting with tough Bosch of the Big Bad City.
Well crafted formidable and flawed characters, brevity that hits with potency, the right words that moved the pace forward, scene to emotion, to gripping finalisation of the case. 

This is where they formally meet and make a pact, with Ballard starting the conversation.
“You forgot that.”
Bosch looked up. The woman-the detective-from the night before at Hollywood Station was straddling the old bench that ran between the free-standing shelves full of case files. She had been out of his line of sight as he came into the cell. He looked over at the open door where the padlock dangled from its chain.
“Ballard, right?” He said .”Good to know I’m not going crazy. I thought I had locked up.”
“I let myself in,” Ballard said.” Lock Picking 101.”
“It’s a good skill to have. Meantime, I’m kind of busy here. Just got a search warrant I need to figure out how to execute without my suspect finding out. What do you want, Detective Ballard?”
“I want in.”
“In?”
“On the Daisy Clayton.”
Bosch considered her for a moment. She was attractive, maybe mid-thirties, with brown, sun-streaked hair cut at the shoulders and a slim, athletic build. She was wearing off-duty clothes. The night before, she had been in work clothes that made her seem more formidable-a must in the LAPD, where Bosch knew female detectives were often treated like office secretaries.
Ballard also had a deep tan, which to Bosch was at odds with the idea of someone who worked the graveyard shift. Most of all he was impressed that it had been only twelve hours since she had surprised him at the file cabinets in the Hollywood detective bureau and she already appeared to have caught up to him and what he was doing.




 

Reviewed by Lou Pendergrast on 30 October 2018