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Children of Paranoia (Children of Paranoia, #1) by Trevor Shane


Book Description
ALL WARS HAVE RULES

Rule Number One: No killing innocent bystanders.

Rule Number Two: No killing anyone under the age of eighteen.

BREAK THE RULES, BECOME THE TARGET

Since the age of eighteen, Joseph has been assassinating people on behalf of a cause that he believes in but doesn’t fully understand. The War is ageless, hidden in the shadows, governed by a rigid set of rules, and fought by two distinct sides-one good, one evil. The only unknown is which side is which. Soldiers in the War hide in plain sight, their deeds disguised as accidents or random acts of violence amidst an unsuspecting population ignorant of the brutality that is always inches away.

Killing people is the only life Joseph has ever known, and he’s one of the best at it. But when a job goes wrong and he’s sent away to complete a punishingly dangerous assignment, Joseph meets a girl named Maria, and for the first time in his life his singleminded, bloody purpose fades away.

Before Maria, Joseph’s only responsibility was dealing death to the anonymous targets fingered by his superiors. Now he must run from the people who have fought by his side to save what he loves most in this world. As Children of Paranoia reaches its heart-in-throat climax, Joseph will learn that only one rule remains immutable: the only thing more dangerous than fighting the War…is leaving it.
“Rule Number one: No killing innocent bystanders. The large majority of this world does not know that this war is raging on beneath their noses. Those people are to be protected at all costs. No collateral damage. The penalty for killing an innocent bystander is death.”

MY REVIEW
“Rule number two: No killing anyone under the age of eighteen no matter what side they’re on. Until you turn eighteen you’re considered an innocent bystander.”

The contenders are grouped in three groups. The first are the soldiers they are at the front line in the war, they go out and kill the enemy. The second group are the Intelligence people the Intel group they are mixed of many specialists computer experts to military planners to name a few. They provide information on the kill and get all the intel needed prepared. The third group called the deep cover guys, their job is to assimilate into society lay low and have family lives as normal as possible. They are the breeders providing the new participants in this war.
The business of this war is real and the protagonist is faced with death as an everyday part of his life if you fail to kill you’re target you have been assigned you would face being killed, if you make a mistake and kill innocents you will be killed. He finds himself looking for answers to questions as time progresses, how can we stop this war? We kill due to our family being killed by the enemy, they are evil and we are good an ever increasing cycle of murder just when will it stop? and who killed first and started this war?
After reading the story there are few things still not answered but when the protagonist finds himself a love interest he starts to see things with a whole different perspective and finds himself protecting and looking to the future of his own newly acquired loved ones. A family with kids would something he could want all this killing could prove to be a dangerous future them. Will he have a family and get out of the secret war?
Most mobsters and hit men will tell you that when you have strings attached, loved ones, partners and kids it becomes a problem you have a weak spot, you don’t need something that you’re enemy could get at and hurt.
Children of paranoia is a catchy title, the plot is interesting and different written mostly from a first person narrative. An assassin’s story of sorts, staking out the Mark to kill and the process of the kill can all makes gripping reading.
I found at times I needed a little plot twist here and there or just a bit more thrill, that could be just me due to reading one too many thrillers. Don’t expect masterful writing on a literary scale as this story is not written in that style. All in all it was an entertaining read that had a good concept going.

Reviewed by Lou Pendergrast on 28 September 2011

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