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Blame by Jeff Abbott


Praise

“An amnesiac accident victim has to investigate her own past in Abbott’s (The First Order, 2016, etc.) tense psychological thriller. The Austin, Texas, suburb of Lakehaven is shaken when two teenagers drive off a cliff; driver Jane Norton survives while high school hero David Hall is killed. Jane comes out of a coma with part of her memory lost, beginning with her father’s mysterious death three years earlier. After a note is found at the accident scene that suggests Jane caused the accident in a suicide attempt, she becomes an outcast and is especially hated by David’s mother, Perri. But all may not be what it seems, as a mysterious internet poster taking the name Liv Danger threatens both Jane and Perri, claiming that “all will pay” when the truth comes to light. Over time Jane becomes less sure she can trust her therapist, any of her friends, or even her mother, who is trying to have her committed to a mental institution. As Jane pieces together her own history, she becomes convinced she wasn’t trying to kill herself, and the accident starts looking more like murder. The unconventional plot, the constant surprises, and above all the psychological depth of the characters all make this a first-rate crime novel.”
—Kirkus Reviews

“…engrossing…this is an emotionally complex tale replete with finely drawn characters, shocking twists, and convincing red herrings.”
—Publishers Weekly

“I could not tear myself away from Jeff Abbott’s mesmerizing, gripping, and claustrophobic novel. BLAME is the perfect blend of complex characters, plot twists galore, and great psychological suspense. Don’t miss it.”
—Harlan Coben, #1 bestselling author of Home and Don’t Let Go

“BLAME is a masterful suspense novel, full of dread, lies, and deceptions. Abbott is one of our finest writers, and BLAME takes his talents to new levels. Sinister and twisting, this is hands-down the best book you’ll read — and re-read — this year. Absolutely top-notch.”
—J.T. Ellison, New York Times bestselling author

Review

A crash
one walks away
not quite
in coma for four days
the other doesn’t
dead
and then there is forgetting the names
the feeling of shame
being the one to Blame.
Something strange afoot.
Amnesia steals from her memories things needed to go forward, she is under siege by her temporal lobe, the whirlwind of her mind trying to piece together and unravell pandoras box of mystery to things past, deaths past, and the need for these things to be clear, her road, her resolution, you hope is near.
This tale brings me be back to a past must read book of fiction Before I go to Sleep that was also adapted to movie, which i see this book Blame playing out on the screen well.
Suspenseful with a memorable very human female lead with complications, empathically and unconventional told, handled with great craftsmanship in an immerssive psychological tale that has the reader captivated with ‘The Girl Who Doesn’t Remember’ to a finale of some resolution from the gaining momentum to the unraveling of truths of the insidious evil that plagues her blame.

 


“JANE NORTON WONDERED what it would be like to remember a single detail of the biggest moment in her life. Today was the second anniversary of the crash. She lay in bed, staring at the ceiling, as if waiting for pictures to appear. But the ceiling above her was only a screen empty of images.”

“It wouldn’t matter. In Lakehaven, Jane Norton was a pariah. A cast-out killer. And Perri was always That Dead Boy’s Mother. That was why Perri hated Jane Norton—she had stolen not just David but her normalcy. Perri had defined herself as a mother from the moment she knew David was growing inside her, and Jane had stolen who she was. She had done more than kill David. She had murdered the person Perri used to be.”

 

 

Reviewed by Lou Pendergrast on 19 July 2017